Tag Archives: cake

Baked Sunday Morning: Dad’s Black Cocoa Bundt with Butter Whiskey Glaze

This cake is intended for dad, on that ever special tie giving holiday, Father’s Day. My husband doesn’t like chocolate cake, but loves whiskey, so I thought the whiskey glaze might win him over. He really deserves something special as for the past week he has been up at 3:30 to check on our crying baby. Both him and my dad are amazing men. Really lucky to have them in my life.

imageI was unable to find black cocoa, but found something really close, Guittard dark cocoa (which looks black, so maybe it was mislabeled) which I used for this cake. I also decreased the sugar as felt like 495 grams was a lot, to 450. The first time I have ever decreased the sugar content in a cake, and it came out fine, so it maybe something I try in the future. I used a 10 cup bundt pan as I do not have a 12 cup, and the batter fit fine and the cake baked within the time called for. I was really worried about this cake as when I checked on it, as it had completely fallen, but I was able to get it out of the pan with a little stickage, and it was not noticable after pouring on the whiskey glaze (after warnings from Sheri I really greased and floured my pan).

image

We were fans of the cake portion, but not the glaze. The whiskey was just too stong and overpowered the cake. The bundt cake had a really nice chocolate flavor and was very moist. The blackness of it is really unique and interesting (although that cocoa powder is a pain to clean-up). In the future, I think I will be making the cake, without the frosting.

Recipe from: Baked Occasions by Matt Lewis and Renato Poliafito

Advertisements
Tagged

Buttery Pound Cake with Salty Caramel Glaze

The Baked boys intended this pound cake to be eaten for Shakespeare Day, something that was eaten during a highschool trip to England. A bit of a stretch, but I didn’t care as I love pound cake because it is delicious, versatile, and very forgiving.

This cake is really easy to put together. Butter (preferably European butter-I used Plugra) and sugar are beaten until fluffy with whole eggs, egg yolks, and vanilla extract incorporated. Flour is mixed in three parts alternating with heavy cream. The instructions call for baking 55-65 minutes. I checked mine at 55, it still wasn’t done and I kind of forgot about it, so at 65 minutes it was a little dark around the edges.

image

There is an optional salty caramel glaze, which should be required. While the pound cake was good, the a glaze made it sublime. I applied the caramel right after the cake was baked by setting the pound cake on a wire rack above a parchment lined half-sheet. I guess I was feeling generous so I recycled any caramel that had dripped onto the pan. Again, questioning why this is optional, as this caramel is amazing, it’s a shame to let any go to waste. Also cutting off and discarding the ends, as the recipe requests, is just crazy. This cake is so outstanding you do not want to waste a crumb. I am usually one of those people who throw away my bread ends, but I ate both of this pound cakes ends. I actually didn’t use the fleur de sel, so my finished project was a pound cake with caramel glaze.

image

Do not let looks fool you, this may not be the most beautiful cake (my full loaf pictures oddly look like meatloaf), but the taste was amazing! The first day it was great, the next day it was also delicious, and sadly this cake didn’t make it to day three or even to the refrigerator as the recipe indicates that some prefer this one cold. My husband and I debated if this was the best Occasions recipe yet, or if it was the Hair of the Dog Cake. My husband prefers the later, but for me this one takes the cake. We served this one plain and with strawberries. It would be great with ice-cream or coffee. This is one cake that I will be making often, Shakespeare day or not. See if the fellow Baked Sunday Mornings bakers liked this one as much as I did.

Recipe from: Baked Occasions by Matt Lewis and Renato Poliafito

Tagged

Baked Sunday Morning: Chocolate Texas Sheet Cake with Peanut Butter Frosting

In the fifth grade we had to do a report on a state. Most of my classmates were fighting over California, as in our minds it was the mecca of childhood fun-yah know Disneyland and all. I actually choose Texas for my report, as my family had spent a good couple of weeks there that summer. My “rich” and older single uncle had finally made the plunge and was getting married in the most miserable time of the Texas summer. The short time I was there taught me that really everything is bigger in Texas, from the belt buckles to the burritos. Texas sheet cake really embodies the everything is bigger in Texas idea as it is an entire half sheet cake of cake, a total of 24 servings. I have had my fair share of Texas sheet cake mostly at large gatherings such as funerals, family reunions, and grade school lunch. It has been a while since I had said cake and my memories were of a very delicious cross between a cake and brownie.

image

This cake is relatively easy to put together. The peanut butter frosting is a boiled affair, that is mixed with powder sugar. I shifted my powder sugar once and really wish I had done it a second time as there were tiny speckles of powder sugar in the finished product, although the entire cake is covered in chopped roasted peanuts, so this imperfection was hidden.

image

This cake bakes fast at 15-18 minutes. I checked mine at 15 and it seemed like it could go a little longer so I left it in for two more minutes. The instructions indicate that it is better to under bake, so I pulled it then for fear of having an over baked cake. Really the cake wasn’t done (or it wasn’t done to my liking-not sure how underdone this was intended to be) and began to sink in the middle and when I poured the frosting on it all ended up in the middle. I tried to evenly distribute it as best I could before putting it in the fridge. I left the cake in the fridge for a couple of hours before cutting into it.

image

The middle was crazy sweet. The combination of fudgy underdone cake with a thick layer of frosting was too much. The edges though were pretty amazing. The cake was light and a good contrast to the sweet peanut frosting and crunchy salty peanuts. We devoured those edges pretty quickly and next time (oh yes, there will be a next time) I may try to bake it slightly longer, or add a little more flour for structural integrity. Also part, of the problem could be due to baking at such a high altitude (that’s why this blog is elevated baker, y’all), which I really think the suggestions previously mentioned would remedy. The Baked boys suggest to this one straight from the fridge, but finding room in the fridge for a half sheet pan of cake was a real challenge, so we kept it at room temperature for almost its entire four day life (with the exception of the required first refrigeration). I really don’t consider this one a loss as the edges more than made up for the middle and really do two people need to consume 24 servings of cake?

Recipe from: Baked Occasions by Matt Lewis and Renato Poliafito

Tagged

Baked Sunday Mornings: Toffee Coffee Cake Surprise

Bunt cakes from Baked are the bomb. The root beer, olive oil, and vanilla bunt cakes are ones that are requested often and are made just as much. My first blog post was for the hazelnut bunt cake, which I liked, but didn’t blow my socks off. This week’s cake was a marriage between a bunt and coffee cake, with the coffee cake topping inside the middle of the bunt. The hidden middle is to symbolize the burrow that Punxsutawney Phil emerges from to tell us how many more weeks of winter we are in for.

image

This middle mixture is comprised of toffee (among other things), with the option to make your own or to use a store bought toffee bar. I decided to make the toffee, and it really wasn’t that hard, although my toffee was a little on the pull out your teeth sticky side. Making this cake was unique-the butter, flours, sugars, vanilla are beat together, then the eggs are added followed by the sour cream.

image

This batter is thick; which made spreading a little difficult. When we tried this cake the same day of baking we thought it was ok. It reminded me of a pound cake more than a coffee cake, and I think the cake would be better with a couple of layers instead of the giant middle layer (although the thick batter may not make that possible). My frosting adverse husband thought it would be better with the addition of some sort of glaze, or frosting.  Oddly, I thought this cake tasted better the next day. We had this cake around for four days and it started to dry out on day four, but really was moist and flavorful days two-three. Not sure if this one will be part of the usual bunt cake rotation, but I am glad I gave this one a try.

Recipe from: Baked Occasions by Matt Lewis and Renato Poliafito

Tagged

Baked Sunday Mornings: Hair of the Dog Cake

I really know nothing about alcohol. I didn’t start drinking until I was 21 found something I like (gin and tonics) and have pretty much stuck to it. During my short lived career as a server, I once had someone ask me for an Arnold Palmer, and I told him I couldn’t serve to him, as by law we could not serve alcohol until noon. This was a while ago, but I am pretty sure I did not get a great tip, but in my defense, Arnold Palmer really sounds like it should contain booze. For me New Year’s is a great holiday because I usually get that day off of work, but I usually find myself parked in front of my TV watching Netflix and thinking of resolutions I can break without any guilt. I usually do not experience the usual hang-over regrets, but the Baked guys described the Hair of the Dog cake as one that is easy to make on those days when you may need a little extra help, so I was looking forward to something fast and easy.

hair #1

 This cake calls for rum, and the suggestion was made to use dark spiced rum. We had one bottle of rum, but my husband refused to let me use it because he thought it was too expensive to throw into a cake. I was thinking of going to the liquor store, but wine, worthwhile beer (anything with an alcohol content above a 3.2), and liquor can only be purchased from a state run liquor store here in Utah and they get really- cannot find a place to park, lines around the block-crazy this time of year. My dad actually had some spiced rum, which was not dark so I came with a brilliant strategy to combine his with my husbands to make dark, spiced rum, but again my husband disagreed. I decided to go with straight-spiced rum.

hair #2

For a Baked cake this is really easy to throw together. It is not an easy one-bowl kind of cake, but it is pretty close. The unique part of this cake is the frosting/glaze. While this cake is still warm a mixture of butter, brown sugar, cream, and rum is poured over the top and then broiled. I patiently waited with the oven door open, and it was pretty interesting to watch the top of the cake bubble.

I was a little worried about this cake, as I wasn’t really sure what to expect. Usually when I bake something I have a general idea of how the end product will taste, but this one left me in the dark. Well, it is delicious. My tasters loved it and got a kick out of the name. It reminds me of a really boozy pineapple upside down cake without the fruit and right side up (maybe this comparison is a bit of a stretch). Not the best looking cake, mine sunk a little in the middle and looked like a belly button, but the taste makes up for the lack of presentation.

Recipe from: Baked Occasions by Matt Lewis and Renato Poliafito

Tagged

Baked Sunday Morning: Wintermint Cake

I spent nine entire months thinking about the combination of mint and chocolate, hunting down junior mint and york peppermint patties and squirreling them away. During my pregnancy it was all I craved, so I am glad I only heard about this cake now, as I probably would have spent all of my waking time making and then eating the wintermint cake. This is the cake equivalent of an inside out junior mint, as it a chocolate cake surrounded by mint buttercream and mint chocolate ganache. For a couple of months my fellow Baked Sunday Morning bakers had been talking about how delicious this cake was, as many of them tested this recipe. Needless to say, I was looking forward to this one.

cake #1

The wintermint cake contains shortening, which may weird some people out, but other than that it is a pretty straightforward recipe (which is good because actually having a baby makes doing anything difficult). I only have two 8-inch cake pans and I waited to put the third cake in after the first two were done baking. I really jumped the gun, I was so excited to get this cake done, that I turned one of the first cakes out too soon. It crumbled everywhere, but the other two came out nicely.

wintermint

The frosting is a cooked buttercream, the traditional Baked buttercream which I have only attempted one other time with disastrous results, so I like a true quitter I have never tried it again. This time I really beat the crap out of the frosting, and it took a couple of trips to the fridge followed by mixing to get this to a somewhat firm texture. I frosted the cake with a crumb coat and put it into the fridge. I noticed that the frosting did firm up considerably once on the cake. Chocolate ganache is layered between the chocolate cake layers, and since I only had two layers I opted to spread some of the ganache over the cake, but please check out Baked Occasions to see how to decorate this cake in an interesting ombre style.

wintermint 2

This cake was a hit with my testers. It had a subtle, yet noticeable mint flavor so even those who are not huge chocolate/mint fans will still probably love this cake. Oddly, my favorite part was the chocolate cake layer that I destroyed. I kept it and had it for breakfast with my morning coffee and it was moist and contained a chocolate punch. I think this cake is delicious without hiding behind a mint layer (I may have also exhausted the love one can have for the mint chocolate combination). I also spent some time perusing through my fellow Baked Sunday Morning bakers blogs and found some helpful tips to use next time (cause there will most certainly be a next time) I make the buttercream.

Recipe from: Baked Occasions by Matt Lewis and Renato Poliafito

Tagged